So..I am wondering what is actually the best cold calling lines/spiel that you have used in the past that is proven to be effective...

I know I do have a colleague before who would always tell her potential recruits and vendors(when negotiating for rates) that it is her birthday eventhough it is not...lol

I have been in the IT industry for a long time and now I am new to the healthcare industry and I am doing a lot of cold calling to build my contacts again...with that said...I would appreciate if you can give me some of your tips and proven effective cold calling lines that closed the deal with your consultants/recruits/clients:)

Have a greta day!

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Hi Elise.  I hope you don't mind a slightly different perspective here. 

 

What you've described is more/less an elaborate way of asking whether someone wants, not only "a" new job - but specifically "this" new job. 

 

That isn't what I want to know at first.  The first thing I need to determine is whether they would want to spend a little time getting to know someone who does nothing BUT spend their work days trying to uncover every job that may open within their field.  (I don't necessarily tell them how much time I spend on Twitter though...:)

 

We use to have a saying "Wanna buy a chicken?" - meaning if you call enough people in a row and ask if they want to buy a chicken eventually you will come across someone who does.  In the meantime though you're passing up plenty of people who might want a fish, some bacon or perhaps a head of lettuce.

 

 

Good point.  Of course within all that I try to get as much info as possible in the hopes of just getting to understand them better so that I might be helpfull to them in the future. 

I just find the direct approach is best to avoid confusion and sincere respect for their time. 

Also, I feel I get better results when I sort of slow down my speech.  We recruiters tend to be high energy fast-talkers and we might get better results if we try to match their tone. 

Jerry Albright said:

Hi Elise.  I hope you don't mind a slightly different perspective here. 

 

What you've described is more/less an elaborate way of asking whether someone wants, not only "a" new job - but specifically "this" new job. 

 

That isn't what I want to know at first.  The first thing I need to determine is whether they would want to spend a little time getting to know someone who does nothing BUT spend their work days trying to uncover every job that may open within their field.  (I don't necessarily tell them how much time I spend on Twitter though...:)

 

We use to have a saying "Wanna buy a chicken?" - meaning if you call enough people in a row and ask if they want to buy a chicken eventually you will come across someone who does.  In the meantime though you're passing up plenty of people who might want a fish, some bacon or perhaps a head of lettuce.

 

 

As someone who did outbound insurance telesales in my gap year, cold calling has been part of my armoury.  However, as someone who is cold called a lot when I am on assignment I can tell you it gets really really tiresome and anything in the least bit aggressive won't work. 

When I was a recruiter I managed to get appointments (and assignments) with very senior consultants - e.g.: Senior Partner Knowledge at Arthur Andersen (it was a while back) European Senior Partner Change Mgmt and Knowledge at KMPG, Gemini Consulting etc etc.  Now, the trick was...... to be absolutely relevant.  I had built up expertise from a couple of searches and knew the market was small and very short on 'talent'.  So - I had something to talk about with these people.  Even if it was to update them on what was happening where and to whom......

It's the only way.  Be an expert.  Be relevant.  And take No for an answer - after all, you do need some target organisations when you are headhunting.

As a recruiter, working for an agency, or in the corporate sector - you should be familiar and willing to cold call. Until you have value to bring to the client or candidate, don't even bother calling. 

Research the client or candidate to bring a personal touch even to your first two sentences. Also, I will guarantee you they won't listen to your name. If you are able to catch their attention in your first couple of sentences they will ask "What was your name again?" or "Who are you with, again?". You should feel confident at that point that you have their attention. 

If you're using a list to call and just dialing through an extension with no insight on who the person is - you're wasting your time... even if you have the best job or the best candidate ever.

Rather, take this approach:

"Mr Candidate, I am calling to congratulate you on the award you received six months ago (or insert other accomplishment or personalization you learned about them while researching) for outstanding accomplishment in (insert accomplishment and industry etc.). I work for (Company) and we are (insert initiative) and I feel you could contribute greatly to helping this get off the ground. Do you have some time to talk?

Don't even bother with your name... you'll likely gain their attention, and they will ask. 

This is proven to work. They don't care who you are until you show you know who they are.

That's why I hated calling straight through a list of insurance agents in my current role, or Big 4 auditors when I worked for a search firm. That is a pure waste of my time and theirs. It brings no value and it's clear to the person on the other line that you are just working the extensions.

So I didn't do it.

I found out who it is I want to talk to, learn who they are and their accomplishments and just open with a factual statement about their background if a candidate, and their business issues and challenges if they were a client. 

I love how this post keeps coming back from time to time...great headlines make great blog posts! 

I would love to hear from people who shared on this topic what are some of the changes/additions to their cold calling ways.

Allison Sherwood notes an absolute truth, that people want to hear about and talk about themselves, not some stranger. Try reversing the dialogue and immediately focus on the person you've called, and avoid the use of "I" and "we" as much as you can.

Interesting discussion. Right on Jerry. I like your approach. You need to briefly explain who you are and what you do. In my 40+ yr in recruiting I have heard/seen it all (Not saying I know it all) @ Peter - Most often our initial approach is to a hiring mgr. Many times we contact the hiring mgr because HR said they didn't need us. But since I specialize in the type of position the hiring mgr is desperately seeking and HR has not been able to deliver, he wants to work with someone that can "get er done". If he sends us to HR, no problem. Our only requirement is we have a conversation with the hiring mgr to see what his vision of the department looks like. You don't get that in a job description.  We work effectively with many HR departments. But you ask why the company would have people (HR or Recruiters) if they don't perform. Honestly, you can't say you have always been able to fill every position you have had?  I disagree with your statement that the 3rd party referred by the manager doesn't have an impact. We specialize in healthcare. If a Surgeon needs a certain type of person to perform duties during surgery that HR has been unable to find, guess what? My cost of services agreement will be signed for a full fee and the search is on.

Hi jennifer,

I love to do research on prospects before I pitch them and Linkedin is great for intell. Mirror your sales pitch to your clients CV if you can find it or good news in their sector. Even crisis news can be a good sign that you're in the know of the prospects industry. I hope this was suscoring and FYI edit your signature great is missed spelled.

 

Success,

 

Lionell Artemus

Founder & CEO

Candidate Resource Inc

 

 

For Health Care cold calling I always get a big response when I say "Hi, my name is Rebecca and I am here to take your temperature.  How's your job going today?"  It breaks the ice and starts a great conversation.

How is Jerry's standard song and dance not a shpiel? Maybe we should define the term

Wow some really clever opening lines here!  I really like the one about your tempurature. 

I cold call candidates more often.  I think now that I am a bit older there is more confidence and gravitas in my voice than 15 years ago.  I think that helps me now.  When I get voice mail what I say is  something like " Hi Steve, I don't know if I am in the right direction.  You were refered to me (very important comment) can you please call me back at 12345 Thanks Elise Reynolds".   I don't say why I am calling but I sound a bit helpless because I am not sure if I am in the right direction.  So about half the time I get a call back. 

OK so once I get the call back or if I am lucky enough to get the person on the phone I am very direct.  I say something like:

"Oh Hi Steve, I found your information doing some research, I am a recruiter.   I understand you are in produced water processing and I would very much like to run something past you very quickly"  (I always say very quickly).   "Is this a good time?"     Yes - I tell them quickly what I have pausing after three sentances to assess their interest.    If it is a bad time I ask to call back at a better time.   might know.  If they might be interested I ask if they have time to discuss further now, not now when. 

So basically, my line is not very clever.  It is direct, to the point with plenty of deference to the time of the person I am calling.  The only spiel part is to be rather vauge when I leave the voice message. 

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