How do you handle candidates who refuse to disclose their compensation information?

Personally, I found that most people were willing to provide their salary information, but once in a while, I came across someone who wouldn't.  If they didn't disclose this to me, I usually moved on, and eliminated them from contention.

 

How do you handle these situations?

Tags: JPKreiss, coaching, executive, for, recruiters, services, training

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I typically move on from these candidates. I usually explain to them why I must ask and if they still refuse then I move on. 

It really depends for me on their skills and how badly I may need them... if it is a position where the pool is great, than I typically move on too, but if I need this candidate for whatever reason I do a little homework to check out their skills using some of the salary sites can give me a ball park idea and then I go back to the candidate and ask if this is the range they need to be in while continuing to search for additional candidates...  But generally, I do move on... 

 

I’d suggest you get another candidate.

If you can’t control this one, at this early stage, I’ve found that it only gets worse as time goes on.

 

i find water boarding to be extremely effective in this situation.

Wow.  A candidate that doesn't want to reveal their compensation.  Maybe they are looking for a big bump up?  Or they were paid a lot more than they think this position will pay. 

 

I would let them know that in able to represent them to this client, or any client, I need to know base salary, bonus if any and how paid, other perks (car allowance, etc.) and current benefit plan.  My goal is to make sure that candidatesa are a good match for my client.  That includes making sure I don't present a candidate that expects more than the position pays, but does include candidates that see other benfits besides salary. 

 

Just had a CFO take a job that is close enough to his home he could walk to work instead of being on the road over 2 hours to and over 2 hours back - in good traffic.  Salary was not a big issue but being closer to home at this stage of his family life was more important to him. Total compensation and benefits got him more than he expected and became a non issue.  We talked about what was most important up front - being close to home.

 

If you know up front what is most important to the candidate and can address those issues to their satisfaction then salary - unless it is really off base - usually isn't an issue.  Might be that it is all about how you ask the question - I don't ask about their salary right off the start.  I learn why they would be interested, what they are looking for and why and gently ease into the salary conversation.  once we are talking about everything that is important to them it just easily comes up in the conversation and they tell me.

 

 

I lovingly tell them i don't work in the dark and suggest that they may want to find a recruiter who does.  Sorry, no  asking salary range or what they paid tax on last year and i am gone.  Don't care who they are or how good they are.  No games, if i rep a candidate they better be for talkin to me and talkin straight.  Now.

@Bill I like waterboarding but it makes such a mess in my office that eliminated it in favor of "no tickee, no washee".

 

That's a HUGE red flag for me. I'd push back and ask why can't they share such information and remind them that it's in both our best interests to disclose everything.

 

If they refuse, I like Bill's approach as well. Close second is forced to watch a 24 hour Rebecca Black marathon. 

I explain my role in the process. If they don't give me salary requirement, it's because they don't get it. Especially if they happen to be an embedded software engineer. 

i outsource it.  dick cheney had a guy.  

Sandra McCartt said:

I lovingly tell them i don't work in the dark and suggest that they may want to find a recruiter who does.  Sorry, no  asking salary range or what they paid tax on last year and i am gone.  Don't care who they are or how good they are.  No games, if i rep a candidate they better be for talkin to me and talkin straight.  Now.

@Bill I like waterboarding but it makes such a mess in my office that eliminated it in favor of "no tickee, no washee".

Before getting to the compensation I already have asked all the responsibilities, lead function, report to, subordinates, size of organization, worked there for how long? whr was previous employment? with these information I can usually tell what level the person's at? so i would give A RANGE my client is willing to offer. And the candidate usually tells me that he is open to consider or not, then the request of resume and an interview appointment. Ones they are sitting in the interview, I give them the company / job info so i usually get the break downs of the package.

Even though this person doesn't get the job, when I call them in 4,6, 10 months the relationship is already build they remember me and it's a 100% cooperation  from there on. And I have had excellent referrals from cases like this. 

 

Why not try giving them a call again after some time?

 

Agreed.

Christopher Lyon said:

I typically move on from these candidates. I usually explain to them why I must ask and if they still refuse then I move on. 

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