hi guys, just wanted to get some feedback on this situation, we have an position we are trying to fill and we have one candidate the facility likes and they have they already arranged to bring this person in for a site interview 9/10 when they do this they will make a job offer to the candidate.  Not guaranteed though, the question is we have another candidate who is also qualified for this position, I have not submitted their CV yet because I am debating waiting until after the first interview to see how it goes before throwing another candidate in the mix.  I am trying to weight the options and wanted to get some feedback from others on how you handle this type of situation....thanks in advance for feedback.

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Mike, my answer is based only on my own opinion and experiences. If I have a strong candidate going in for an in person and have not yet submitted someone else, I usually wait until after the interview. Especially if there have already been phone interviews, and the hiring manager is feeling positive. If all is getting done within a short amount of time, I still have other candidates to present if the offer is not made or accepted. A lot of people will probably disagree, but I gauge whether the factor of multiple candidates is going to muck up the works or not. I also generally only send a candidate to one client at a time, where I feel they will fit best.

It does seem like a basic question, but I bet you're not the only one who thinks about it - new, experienced, whatever. Hope you get some helpful answers.

Thanks Amber for the positive input, I would like to see how others feel as well, excluding Josh who has nothing useful to say.

Yeah, that was uncalled for, Joshua..  The answer is yes, you should presentt all appropriate candidates.  If you don't, someone else might.   

The pro - as Bill said, is you get ahead of anyone else that might be submitting candidates. I normally do present until an offer is made and accepted (because you just never know).

On the other hand, you don't want to muddy the waters. If you're in a situation with a client where USUALLY the in person candidate gets an offer, and you're reasonably sure the candidate would accept, then it's ok to wait. Especially if we're talking about a couple of days until you know.

So yeah we ALL struggle with this from time to time. Perfectly reasonable question IMO.

Seriously, this is the one question that is a total joke and why many Professional Recruiters cringe.  What is your job Mike?  What is the #1 duty and function of a recruiter?  You have a fiduciary duty to your clients.  If your manager did not train you on that shame on him.  It's not your fault.  However, use some common sense man.  What downside is there to submitting more people?  Then think about it this way, what are the downsides to NOT submitting this qualified person you have?

You always want your clients to have trouble deciding who to hire.  That's better than them not liking the people you sent.  That way you know they'll hire one of your people.  Get it?  Sometimes they'll just cave and hire two or more because they are both so good.

Amber - If "senior" recruiters "think" about this scenario and don't have an automatic answer, they are one of the reasons some people don't respect recruiters.  With experience you gain knowledge.  This is more basic than basic.

Mike - Learn this lesson now and you'll never need to learn it again.  1) always be professional.  It doesn't matter what the other party is doing.  You control yourself not others.  That's rule #1.

Your manager is at fault.  

@Josua - You obviously have a very strong opinion and that's fine. I think you could have gotten your point across without being as aggressive or denigrating. I do agree with this point you made: Learn this lesson now and you'll never need to learn it again.  1) always be professional.

Great advice.

The problem with submitting another candidate when they already really like the one is if you submit another they may chose the later candidate, and that candidate may decline the offer if one is made. I have a good feeling about the first candidate and am pretty confident she would accept if an offer is made. Seems like everyone has diffrent opinions on this, thus the question, Josh, FYI you think you are right but honestly you are not.

Yes, I do that.  And I tell them that up front.  I'm going to keep presenting till you tell me to stop.  And even then I may present.  You are not going to change their mind if they feel they have the right person.  You just show how great you are.  

Amy Ala said:

The pro - as Bill said, is you get ahead of anyone else that might be submitting candidates. I normally do present until an offer is made and accepted (because you just never know).

On the other hand, you don't want to muddy the waters. If you're in a situation with a client where USUALLY the in person candidate gets an offer, and you're reasonably sure the candidate would accept, then it's ok to wait. Especially if we're talking about a couple of days until you know.

So yeah we ALL struggle with this from time to time. Perfectly reasonable question IMO.

This is a question many, many, many recruiters ask in the early parts of their careers.  And while it is a part of good training and management, it comes up either way.  Part of the learning curve is asking the questions and thank you Mike for posting yours.  

@ Josh - I'm sorry for the remark I am about to make but your question is asinine.

Shortly thereafter you say the #1 rule is to: always be professional, take some of your own advice there pal, clearly you havent learned the #1 rule.

Is the kettle black or red Josh?

Mike - Its obvious you don't have experience.  "Feelings" won't get you anywhere and you'll find out some crazy surprises if you stick with recruiting long enough.  I've been doing this for the best companies in the world for 12 years Mike.  I am approached by other recruiters to train and help their organizations.  You don't have to follow but honestly, you'll learn the hard way.  

You'll find that clients are unpredictable.  Sometimes they'll hire people you thought they would never even talk to.  You'll find they'll totally reject people you thought were "perfect" for the job.  Now, if this case in point turns out in your favor, that's great.  That's what you want, but is there any reason you wouldn't want to be proactive and be prepared in case they don't?

You can't dream you have to prepare.  John Wooden said "people you don't plan to fail, they fail to plan".

It's not about being "right".  I'm kind of laughing to myself right now.  

Just do what you will.  This is all free advice.

Check out my profile and peruse my other blogs.  I think you'll benefit.

Touche.... nice subtle jab.

Amber, good luck with your recruiting.  The #1 benefit is having great relationships.  If you've got that with your clients you can throw the rules out the window.  These are "generalizations" and basic rules of thumbs.  I have clients where they aways hire the first person I submit but it took me years to get there.  I have clients who want to hire without seeing a resume simply based on my recommendations.  I won't let that happen.... too much pressure.  I want them to be on the hook for their own decisions.


Amber said:

@Josua - You obviously have a very strong opinion and that's fine. I think you could have gotten your point across without being as aggressive or denigrating. I do agree with this point you made: Learn this lesson now and you'll never need to learn it again.  1) always be professional.

Great advice.

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