hi guys, just wanted to get some feedback on this situation, we have an position we are trying to fill and we have one candidate the facility likes and they have they already arranged to bring this person in for a site interview 9/10 when they do this they will make a job offer to the candidate.  Not guaranteed though, the question is we have another candidate who is also qualified for this position, I have not submitted their CV yet because I am debating waiting until after the first interview to see how it goes before throwing another candidate in the mix.  I am trying to weight the options and wanted to get some feedback from others on how you handle this type of situation....thanks in advance for feedback.

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Sure Josh, keep telling yourself your right, and btw you dont know my title so dont say I dont have experience, ive done it both ways and its a matter of opinion. I could care less what companies you have worked for your obviously insecure and are a huge hypocrite.

That was professional.  I said sorry first. :P

Besides, you're late,  I already gave credit to Amber for that one.

Mike said:

@ Josh - I'm sorry for the remark I am about to make but your question is asinine.

Shortly thereafter you say the #1 rule is to: always be professional, take some of your own advice there pal, clearly you havent learned the #1 rule.

Is the kettle black or red Josh?

You'll learn.

Mike said:

Sure Josh, keep telling yourself your right, and btw you dont know my title so dont say I dont have experience, ive done it both ways and its a matter of opinion. I could care less what companies you have worked for your obviously insecure and are a huge hypocrite.

Right on point....then they know who to come back to later for another search!  Also, you have Plan B.  If you have a typical fee agreement, they'll pay you later if a new position opens up and they remember one of your people for that position.  You don't even have to do more work!

Bill Schultz said:

Yes, I do that.  And I tell them that up front.  I'm going to keep presenting till you tell me to stop.  And even then I may present.  You are not going to change their mind if they feel they have the right person.  You just show how great you are.  

Amy Ala said:

The pro - as Bill said, is you get ahead of anyone else that might be submitting candidates. I normally do present until an offer is made and accepted (because you just never know).

On the other hand, you don't want to muddy the waters. If you're in a situation with a client where USUALLY the in person candidate gets an offer, and you're reasonably sure the candidate would accept, then it's ok to wait. Especially if we're talking about a couple of days until you know.

So yeah we ALL struggle with this from time to time. Perfectly reasonable question IMO.

Noel - I know this is your site so I get the damage control.  But common.... lol

Noel Cocca said:

This is a question many, many, many recruiters ask in the early parts of their careers.  And while it is a part of good training and management, it comes up either way.  Part of the learning curve is asking the questions and thank you Mike for posting yours.  

The more you talk the more you show.  I know who the real recruiters are on this site

Sigh. Joshua, I normally agree with you but I think you're being rather mean... not sure where that's coming from.

Let's look at what we do know - Mike says he's got a guy going for an in-person (assuming final) interview, in which 9 times out of 10 an offer is made. He's asking (a valid question, IMO) should he send another candidate? The potential downside is the client could be the type that gets distracted by "shiny new candidates". Great candidate in the hand (the interviewee) another great candidate in the bush (the submittal), oooh what's behind door number three??? and now the client is waiting to pull the trigger because if these two or so good who knows what else I could find if I keep taking submittals??

I suppose it's possible I'm the only recruiter ever who has had this happen... but it has happened. The bottom line is you have to know your client. Bill makes an excellent point - he's up front through the entire process that he will continue to submit. That's perfectly reasonable, but so is waiting a day or two until an "almost but not quite sure thing" plays itself out.

We've uncovered a few industry facts here - and one of them is a biggie:  We can not predict anything. 

 

What you have is a sendout Mike.  Don't ring up the credit cards just yet.  It is nothing more than a "possible" offer.  At that point you will then have just that, an offer. 

 

So what's the problem here? 

 

Until you have an offer for your candidate (and an acceptance....and a start date....and an invoice.....and a payment....) you've got "a shot" at those things happening.


Why not take 2 shots?

 

Or better yet - oh no! Here I go!

 

Why don't you ask your client?  "Hey, Larry.  I'm torn here.  I know you're pretty pumped up about Jane's interview Monday - but I've uncovered a sharp guy that is also right on target.  Which way would you like to go?"

 

A rule I learned a few decades ago still holds true:  If your client is still taking sendouts - they better be yours! 

:)  Glad you joined in the conversation but at this point..... its like beating a dead horse.  Just coming to realize what this is all about.... the guy already has his mind made up.  He'll learn some day.  


Jerry Albright said:

We've uncovered a few industry facts here - and one of them is a biggie:  We can not predict anything. 

 

What you have is a sendout Mike.  Don't ring up the credit cards just yet.  It is nothing more than a "possible" offer.  At that point you will then have just that, an offer. 

 

So what's the problem here? 

 

Until you have an offer for your candidate (and an acceptance....and a start date....and an invoice.....and a payment....) you've got "a shot" at those things happening.


Why not take 2 shots?

 

Or better yet - oh no! Here I go!

 

Why don't you ask your client?  "Hey, Larry.  I'm torn here.  I know you're pretty pumped up about Jane's interview Monday - but I've uncovered a sharp guy that is also right on target.  Which way would you like to go?"

 

A rule I learned a few decades ago still holds true:  If your client is still taking sendouts - they better be yours! 

Amy - you're right about the distraction but its ill placed in the present conversation.  Your situation is advanced.  This conversation is superficial at best.  Look at the original post, look at the words and the context.  It's clear.  He's a novice and excited about "one" interview.  I mean..... really.  Apples and oranges compared to the deep relationship and history you've already had with your client.  You can throw these rules out the window once you've gotten to the stage where you have an established practice and senior enough to make valid judgment calls and most of all have a solid relationship with your clients so you know exactly how they operate.  This is not that case....its quite clear.

Amy Ala said:

Sigh. Joshua, I normally agree with you but I think you're being rather mean... not sure where that's coming from.

Let's look at what we do know - Mike says he's got a guy going for an in-person (assuming final) interview, in which 9 times out of 10 an offer is made. He's asking (a valid question, IMO) should he send another candidate? The potential downside is the client could be the type that gets distracted by "shiny new candidates". Great candidate in the hand (the interviewee) another great candidate in the bush (the submittal), oooh what's behind door number three??? and now the client is waiting to pull the trigger because if these two or so good who knows what else I could find if I keep taking submittals??

I suppose it's possible I'm the only recruiter ever who has had this happen... but it has happened. The bottom line is you have to know your client. Bill makes an excellent point - he's up front through the entire process that he will continue to submit. That's perfectly reasonable, but so is waiting a day or two until an "almost but not quite sure thing" plays itself out.

After all this - my money is on "Sorry for the delay in getting feedback to you Mike.  We've made some shifts in our workload - and decided to promote someone internally.  Thank you for all your help."

 

#Sarcasm

 

You dont know me or my position, so dont assume .. this thread was to get opinions and yours clearly doesnt matter .. wanna grab lunch tomorrow on me?  ill apologize in advance, whats your favorite chinese restaurant?
 
Joshua Lee said:

The more you talk the more you show.  I know who the real recruiters are on this site

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