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Amy Ala's Blog – January 2012 Archive (3)

An Open Letter To My Candidates

I’m sorry. I’m sorry that you’re frustrated, annoyed, sad, angry, and despite your efforts, still trying to get a new job. I’m writing you this letter so that you’ll understand that it was not my intention to ignore you, leave you hanging, or cost you your dream job. I hate that your application got trapped in the black hole known as our ATS. I apologize for taking 3 days to respond to your email and even longer to call you back. In the interest of giving you a better “candidate experience”…


Added by Amy Ala on January 31, 2012 at 2:14pm — 19 Comments

The Real Reasons Why Corporate Recruiters Hate You

Agency and corporate recruiters have always had this love/hate relationship. It’s a sibling rivalry of sorts – in some cases each thinks the other doesn’t know what they’re doing. After 10+ years on the agency side, I have a great deal of admiration and respect for those that do it well. I also have a newfound respect for my corporate brothers and sisters as I enter my 7th month on the dark side. I still maintain that recruiters shouldn't be allowed to go internal until they've…


Added by Amy Ala on January 12, 2012 at 12:52pm — 81 Comments

The Power of Persistence

I just love a happy ending. One of the great emotional payoffs of this business is how darn happy people are when you help them land their “dream job”. It’s even sweeter when someone overcomes the odds.


I sent an offer letter last week to a young lady who first applied to a position back in June. Six months ago. She got the standard rejection letter, someone else was hired for the job, and that’s the end. Or was it…? For Ann, it wasn’t. She knew she wanted to…


Added by Amy Ala on January 5, 2012 at 4:49pm — 11 Comments


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