16 Things To Do For Successful Interviewing

  1. Research the company, the leadership, the industry, the competition, your competition. This is a never ending task, not a one time event. Put at least one additional set of eyes on this. It’sthat important.
  2. Create an agenda. It’s really a game plan.
  3. Prepare your questions.
  4. Let the interviewer do most of the talking. This involves skillful means.
  5. Be subtle and skillful in how you handle questions and answers.
  6. Uncover/discover who will make the hiring decision and when.
  7. Allow yourself no assumptions.
  8. Do not close.
  9. Do not make a presentation.
  10. Demonstrate your qualifications and abilities without making declarative statements.
  11. Stay focused and disciplined throughout.
  12. Take notes.
  13. Prove to those interviewing you that you’re listening; it’s a compliment.
  14. Make sure you have the basics right and appropriate to the situation: dress, grooming, demeanor etc.
  15. Be yourself. Relax. Enjoy. Smile.
  16. Trust yourself, your ability, your powers of discernment, your judgement.

 

Views: 3598

Tags: agenda, coaching, interview, process, skills

Comment by Tim Spagnola on October 18, 2011 at 9:02am

Allow yourself no assumptions - That is a good one to remind folks of since I feel it is easy for most to just get wrapped up in the moment. A solid list of tips/reminders regardless. Thanks for sharing.

Comment by Jennifer Norene on October 18, 2011 at 11:37am

Great information. I love the comment about no assumptions. A company's reputation can definitely be better or worse "up close and personal". Thanks!

 

Comment by New Negotiator on October 18, 2011 at 12:01pm

Thank you, Jennifer and Tim, for your comments. By maintaining a 'no assumptions' outlook, a candidate's ability to see the situation "as it really is" is enhanced. Thinking should stay sharp & focused; situational awareness should stay sharp as well. Ask a couple of really well thought questions, and the whole interview will pop open.

Comment by New Negotiator on October 18, 2011 at 4:35pm
I teach and coach a system of interviewing that is both unique and proprietary. You have picked up on some of the things that make my approach different. I'll attempt to answer your questions, but in so far as I don't give too much of my system away. If I'm unclear, you may assume its on purpose.

1.In my system it doesn't matter which type of interview it is.
2.This is a New Negotiator Agenda; it is specific and detailed, and used in a highly disciplined way. It is a tool that becomes more important with each interview in the sequence.
3.The questions used have a specific format as well.
4.It means what it says;it is a point of differentiation.
5. Subtle is subtle. No, it is not coy,devious, etc,.. although it certainly can be handled improperly. It's skillful. It's different. It's effective.
6. All the time, even when you think you have the answer. Verify.
7.Allow yourself no assumptions. Ever. It's part of being disciplined. Assumptions blind you to what is really going on.You begin to see things you want to see, hope to see, and don't see the things you're afraid to see.
8.I'm glad you disagree, My candidate will get an offer.
9.That's covered in number 14.
10.There will be a disagreement here forever. You have your way, I have mine. I disagree with your basic premise. An interviewer wants to know, first and foremost: how effective will this candidate be? Passion is part of it, but not all of it, not even most of it.
11.ok
12.In all situations where the candidate is making contact with the hiring firm.
13.My system is more subtle than just leaning forward. This too becomes a tool.
14.ok
15.yes
16.yes again. These last two are not controversial.

Thank you, Valentino, for this opportunity to explain, a little,about my system. I hope we can explore these ideas more fully sometime.
Comment by Valentino Martinez on October 18, 2011 at 4:36pm

Hello New Negotiator,

Your “16 Things To Do for Successful Interviewing” are helpful but a little confusing.  So I hope you don’t mind if I try to make some sense of them, at least for my better understanding of what you intended.

  1. Research the company, the leadership, the industry, the competition, your competition. This is a never ending task, not a one time event. Put at least one additional set of eyes on this. It’sthat important. First, I’m not clear on this question relative to the purpose of researching “your (my) competition”? And is this a job interview or an information gathering interview? There is a difference between approaches.
  2. Create an agenda. It’s really a game plan. OK.
  3. Prepare your questions. OK.
  4. Let the interviewer do most of the talking. This involves skillful means. Here I’m confused. I agree if this is an information gathering interview.  However, in a job interview the interviewer ideally allows the interviewee do most of the talking (again my confusion as to which way this “interview advice" is going).
  5. Be subtle and skillful in how you handle questions and answers. How does one “Be subtle” in a job interview.  And why would they want to be subtle in an info gathering interview? And does that work in your favor? I can understand being truthful and straight forward, but being subtle? Isn’t that closer to being: coy, devious, elusive, crafty, sly or difficult to understand?
  6. Uncover/discover who will make the hiring decision and when. Smart.
  7. Allow yourself no assumptions. I always have one assumption—that this will be a mutually benefiting experience. 
  8. Do not close. I disagree. Particularly for “sales jobs”, but for all jobs, assuming this is a job interview, I better CLOSE by asking for the job if it is the job and employer I want to pursue.  If I don’t “close” I may leave them wondering if I’m even interested.
  9. Do not make a presentation. But you better be presentable….
  10. Demonstrate your qualifications and abilities without making declarative statements. Going in without passion about what I have done and can do will not get me the job. I as an interviewer want to get a sense of that passion in an interviewee…about what they’ve accomplished and their ambitions…what they care about.
  11. Stay focused and disciplined throughout. This particularly applies to the interviewer and is logical for the interviewee.
  12. Take notes. Clearly...for information gathering interviews.  Not too much for a job interview--unless the questions border on illegal...then you want to get the quote down correctly.
  13. Prove to those interviewing you that you’re listening; it’s a compliment. Yes, lean forward without falling forward.
  14. Make sure you have the basics right and appropriate to the situation: dress, grooming, demeanor etc. And arrive ahead of time so that you’re composed and ready--not perplexed because you just rushed in.
  15. Be yourself. Relax. Enjoy. Smile. Yes.
  16. Trust yourself, your ability, your powers of discernment, your judgement. Yes, indeed.
Comment by Amy Ala on October 18, 2011 at 4:42pm

I'm afraid I have to agree with Valentino here... I agree with many points but your candidate would never get the job at my company.  The one consistent complaint all my hiring managers have is when  candidate doesn't ask for the job.  In other words - CLOSE. (# 8)

Comment by New Negotiator on October 18, 2011 at 5:36pm

You're equating asking with closing. I don't do that, I avoid that link. Could there be two ways to get to the same point?

 

Hiring managers have no problem knowing that the candidates I coach want the job. 

Comment by Valentino Martinez on October 18, 2011 at 6:03pm

@New Negotiator--being mysterious because you want to protect your "unique and proprietary" interviewing technique is understandable. I guess that goes for your name as well?  However, you're selling through the patented "tease system" of show & tell just enough to get a buy.

Amy and I feel that effective "closing" makes a positive impression on the majority of hiring managers.  Yet you declare your candidate will get the offer without closing (isn't that a declarative statement?).

And it does matter what kind of interview you're conducting--which is why some of your points clash with some of your other points. 

Good sell job.

Comment by StaffingStarr on October 18, 2011 at 6:24pm

16 VALUABLE interviewing tips!  I really like the points mentioned because preparation really "empowers" the person being interviewed. You might have covered this in a few of your points, but where would you add the point that "the interviewee is also interviewing the company"?  I would want to know why I (the interviewee) should consider working for that company, ie - selling points...  It might be risky for the average job seeker to pose this type of question. Could you offer your input or suggestions? 

Comment by Sandra McCartt on October 18, 2011 at 10:55pm

What do you charge for coaching a candidate?  How long do you work with each candidate.?  Do you do this in a group setting or on a one to one basis?  Do you guarantee candidates will be a success in an interview if they follow your program to the letter?

Let's cut to the chase and talk money, time and success.  If i am going to buy what you are selling i want to know how much it costs.

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