Employee Branding: Quantity v's Quality


A misconception amongst many hiring managers is the belief that being a recognised or international company/brand is enough to attract the best talent. New research has now proven statistically that this is definitely not the case. The real truth is, regardless of your company size, finding great talent is difficult. 

According to advisory firm CEB, even the biggest and best organisations are failing to attract the right mix of talent because of unappealing or confusing employer brands. The study, surveyed more than 2,000 recruiting staff from North America, Asia Pacific, Europe and the Middle East. A major finding was that employers are under increasing pressure to attract new “types of talent”. As the technological age continues, capability skill sets are changing. An example of this is an increasing demand for candidates (in all business disciplines) who possess highly developed analytical capability.

“Employers simply cannot carry on doing what they’ve always done. Branding for universal appeal just results in more headaches for the HR team who have to sift through a greater volume of low-grade candidates. Companies have to stop chasing universal popularity and adapt a ‘lure the best, deflect the rest’ mindset to employment branding,” Martin said.

Even more interesting to note, most applicants are not accessing information that originates with the company, with 61% saying they were skeptical about what employers had to say about themselves. This is an important to lesson for employers and one where the approach to employee branding needs to be a lot more comprehensive that just building a corporate employee branding strategy.

The research suggests that although three-quarters of companies around the globe have invested in formal employer branding initiatives in the past three years, just a quarter of candidates applying for roles are high quality.

“Today’s employers face greater challenges than ever in attracting the right mix of talent, especially as the economy allows for a move from survival to growth mode," CEB executive director Jean Martin said. "As businesses diversify their products and services, they have to hire people with skills their brand was never designed to attract."

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Tags: Branding, Corporate, Employment, Recruiting

Comment by Keith Halperin on July 31, 2014 at 9:48pm

Thanks, Tracey. "*The research suggests that although three-quarters of companies around the globe have invested in formal employer branding initiatives in the past three years, just a quarter of candidates applying for roles are high quality."

I think this is quite encouraging, as it may indicate that most high-quality candidates aren't naive, foolish, young, desperate, or just plain stupid enough to believe the digital-sewage-treatment-plant of **exaggerations, half-truths, used-ta-be/has-beens, wannabe/wishful thinking, and occasionally downright lies that are likely the corpaganda of many companies' EB programs... At the same time, since it IS probably much cheaper to pay people to SAY you are a good place to work than it is to actually BE a good place to work, and since their largesse helps keep our marketing friends out of the poorhouse, KEEP IT UP, 75% OF COMPANIES!

Keep Blogging,

Keith

*Whose research, BTW? CEB's? If so, what's CEB's stake in all this?

**After a few weeks/months at a place and all the skeleons have come out of their closets to say "hello", how many of the places you and I've worked have turned out to be anywhere as near as nice as portrayed? I've worked at nice places before, but they've usually not "shouted it to the hills"...

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