With the new found optimism for 2010 and a promising economic forecast, are you contemplating whether this is the right time for a career change? Is now the time to jump ship for a better opportunity?

Amidst restructuring and countless layoffs in 2009, employees were thankful to be working. Disengaged and unsatisfied, employees were more likely to suck it up if they felt taken advantage in their position. Employees had no choice but to pick up the slack, quite often taking on a heavier workload resulting in a sea of overworked and underpaid workers. Ultimately employees accepted the unpleasant circumstances if it meant they still have a job in a dire economy.

With the tide turning and the economy set to head in a positive direction in 2010, companies have begun to hire again, translating to an increase in opportunities for job seekers. This shift will mean the end to company wide hiring freezes and salary caps that we all came to know in 2009. Employers will be looking to add staff to handle the bounce back in demand and fuel the rebound expected with an increase in business as the economy battles back.

With new job prospects in 2010, employees will begin to look around and research what other opportunities are out there. Could 2010 be the year you are finally recognized for your ability to adapt to under less than ideal circumstances in 2009? If not, does this mean you will reconsider your current position and move to a better opportunity in 2010? Will your loyalty be rewarded? Are you prepared to walk away if it isn’t?

These are questions you need to consider before making your next career move.

Some will play it safe and stick it out to see what the future holds before deciding to test the waters. Others have already used the downtime over the holidays to update their resumes and brush up on their interviewing techniques. It appears that 2010 will bring a calming effect to the harsh economic conditions we came to know in 2009. Optimism is in the air and change is evident. Whatever you decide to do with your career as a result of these changes; ultimately lies in your hands. There are risks with any big decision but there are also potential great rewards... Question is will you sink or swim?

Views: 11

Comment by Becky Franzen on January 7, 2010 at 12:15pm
Great post and we will likely see more and more attrition with employees based on a the ability to handle the perception of "things are getting better and you aren't doing anything about it internally". I have a client right now that is starting to lose star performers to competitors because the things they took away (401k matching, bonuses, etc) aren't coming back with the new revenue and signed deals.
Comment by Ron Rafelli on January 7, 2010 at 12:23pm
Many companies made cuts to both salary and especially benefits over the past couple of years, and for legitimate reasons. Now that we appear to be coming out of the woods, those who choose to reinstate these sooner will keep many more of their strong performers. Those who choose to try to stretch it out to minimize their expenses will find that is costs them much more in lost talent than they saved by being cheap, and they will have the higher turnover that they deserve.
Comment by Alan Strauss on January 13, 2010 at 11:06am
It is always interesting to see how talent will react to market conditions. One component that is not typically discussed is the rising demand and interet for the contingent workforce. There are many reports that the contigent workforce could triple over the next 5 years. Obviously, that will have a dramatic impact on this discussion.

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