Recruiting Employees You Can Trust

During the hiring process, there are a number of characteristics employers have to look for in new recruits and one of which is trustworthiness.

If you're in search of a new employee for your business, then there must be a certain level of trust in order to create a worry-free work environment.

When it comes time to put the "help wanted" sign out, here are a few keys to finding an employee you can trust:

Diligently Check References

Your first line of defense in finding an employee you can trust is thoroughly checking all the candidate's references.

Former employer references are obviously the best resource for digging deeper into a potential employee's work ethic and character, but personal references are also helpful.

Some red flag warnings to look for are gaps of time between employers or a general lack of references. If there are gaps of time in the potential candidate's references, it could mean they are neglecting to mention past employers who might not speak highly of them.

Don't Skimp on the Interview

After you've perused the candidate's application and called their references, the next step in finding a trustworthy employee is the interview process. There is an art to interviewing because you want to ask a combination of questions that pertain to the candidate's professionalism as well as character.

Although standard interview questions like the ever popular "why you think you'd be a good fit" question are always good to ask, it's important to customize the interview based on each candidate's application and resume.

By doing so, you'll get a personal feel for each candidate as opposed to a general understanding based on generic questions.

Learn to Read Body Language

If you really want to find an employee you can trust, then you need to become a body language expert. Reading a person's body language isn't difficult as long as you concentrate on two factors: eye contact and body movements.

During the interview process, if a candidate neglects to make eye contact with you while answering questions and continuously makes body shifts, it could mean they aren't being completely honest or forthright with their answers.

Dishonesty could lead to other issues, like unreliability and theft.

If you are worried about employee theft, there are many affordable security camera options available from larger retailers like Walmart that can give you peace of mind with your staff.

Conduct a Personality Survey

Personality surveys are a great way to instill company values before a new employee begins work.

Most surveys are based on honesty and trustworthy habits and include questions like, "if you saw another employee steal, what would you do?" In addition, personality surveys also emphasize exactly what your business is looking for in an upstanding employee.

Trust Your Gut Instincts

Once you're through interviewing and you've narrowed your search down to a handful of potential employees, it's time to go with your gut.

Gut instincts can say a lot about how you feel and are based more so on critical thinking than chance. So, if your gut is telling you to choose one candidate over another, learn to trust those instincts.

By keeping in mind the pointers above, you'll choose trustworthy employees every time you hire.

Photo credit: Image courtesy of stockimages / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

About the Author: Adam Groff is a freelance writer and creator of content. He writes on a variety of topics including business ethics and the environment.

Views: 116

Tags: Human Resources, employees, office, recruitment, security

Comment by Keith Halperin on May 29, 2014 at 8:11pm

Thanks Adam. If you're nervous or on the Autistic Spectrum Diosrder (ASD), you're likely to have"weird" body language, but that doesn't mean they shouldn't trust you...

-kh

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