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Who is ‘The Recruitment & Employment Confederation’?

Having worked as a Freelance Recruitment Consultant for a number of years now and having to pit myself against big businesses, with teams of highly trained legal and HR professionals, I had to find some way of proving to my clients that I was just as capable, competent and carried the same standards as the big boys.

This is where the Recruitment & Employment Confederation (REC) came in, I’ve put together a ‘low down’ of who they are and what they stand for, as a resource to provide to my clients and anyone else curious as to what the REC stand for.

Many businesses, whether it’s a freelance consultant like me, or an international recruitment agency like apexecutive, display the REC logo on their home page.

Please see example at the bottom of the page.

Who is the REC?

The REC originally took roots over 80 years ago as the London Employment Agencies Federation (LEAF) and only became the Recruitment & Employment Confederation in January 2000, as the result of two merging companies – The Federation of Recruitment and Employment Services (FRES) and the Institute of Employment Consultants (IEC).

They formed as one unified professional body as they believed the industry needed a representative for the increasing regulations and as the need for training and education across the industry was in increasing demand.

It was on this premises the REC was born, their vision:

‘To lead a successful and respected recruitment industry that is recognised for its positive contribution to UK plc.’

What are the requirements of becoming an REC member?

There are different levels of membership within the REC; you can either register as a corporate member or an individual member of the Institute of Recruitment Professionals (IRP).

To gain corporate membership the company must meet with the REC’s ‘Code of Professional’ practise and comply with at least two of the following:

  • ‘have been trading for at least one year in the UK
  • Are owned or operated by one or more individuals with more than one year’s experience of working in the recruitment industry
  • Are owned or operated by one or more individuals who have attended the REC 3-day ‘starting up a recruitment agency’ course.’

The other option for membership is via the Institute of Recruitment Professionals, the requirements to attain this are:

  • ‘affiliate – for those who have been working in recruitment for less than 10 years
  • member – for those who have been working in recruitment for 10 years or more and/or those who hold an REC qualification (certificate, diploma or degree)
  • fellow – 15 years’ experience in recruitment or 10 years’ experience in recruitment and the certificate in recruitment practise or 5 years’ experience in recruitment and the degree in recruitment’

If the above criteria are met with you must then pass the REC’s online compliance test. This ensures that all members ‘model contracts’ are either the same as the REC’s or meet with the required standards. This provides the highest standards and consistency throughout the industry.

By committing to becoming an REC member you are agreeing to follow their ‘Code of Professional Practice’ at all times, and are open to investigation at any time from board members.

What is the REC’s Code of Professional Practice?

‘Members will observe the highest principles of ethics, equality, integrity, professional conduct and fair practice in dealing with others and will conduct their business in a manner designed to enhance the operation, image and reputation of the recruitment industry and REC members.’ – The REC.

The REC’s Code of Practice (in brief):

Principle 1: Respect for laws

Principle 2: Respect for honesty and transparency

Principle 3: Respect for work relationships

Principle 4: Respect for diversity

Principle 5: Respect for safety

Principle 6: Respect for professional knowledge

Principle 7: Respect for certainty of engagement

Principle 8: Respect for prompt and accurate payment

Principle 9: Respect for ethical international recruitment

Principle 10: Respect for confidentiality and privacy

For a full copy of the Code of Practice, click here.

Whether the recruitment company you choose to work with is an international entity or an individual freelance consultant, if they are an approved member of the REC, they all adhere to the same codes of practice and therefore provide the same level of standards set within the industry.

The REC also provides on-going training, networking events and legal support to its members, meaning they have access to the most up-to-date information within the industry.

Hopefully this guide will better help you understand what the REC logo now means for recruitment companies.

For further resources please visit either the REC or IOR website.

Author Bio: Sarah Diamond is a freelance recruitment consultant.

 

Views: 189

Tags: Recruiting Tools / Sourcing

Comment by Mitch Sullivan on July 10, 2013 at 12:31pm

This statement is simply not true:

"Whether the recruitment company you choose to work with is an international entity or an individual freelance consultant, if they are an approved member of the REC, they all adhere to the same codes of practice and therefore provide the same level of standards set within the industry."

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